Discovering the Power of Self-Compassion

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Discovering the Power of Self-Compassion

Discovering the Power of Self-Compassion

By Thea Fitch.

Do you feel uncomfortable or self indulgent when you do things for yourself, like you don’t deserve it?

Do you ever feel cut off from others, as if other people are somehow better able to cope with life’s difficulties?  

Do you tend to criticize and judge yourself more harshly than you would others?

Do you concentrate more on your strengths and failures, rather than your strengths and successes?

Well, I certainly did!  I struggled with a severe eating disorder, requiring several hospitalisations, for many years.  Yet it was only through reaching “rock bottom”, and having nowhere else to go, that I was able to give myself permission to try a different approach – one based on treating myself with the same kindness that I would hope to show to others.  

Because of past experiences, and the very self-critical voice that I used to orientate myself in the world, I was constantly creating a self-image that was very negative. I lacked any notion of my worth as a human being with good intentions. This meant that I kept myself very isolated from people - I had so effectively convinced myself that I was “not good enough” or “different” from others in some way that I became the essence of aloneness.  

Self compassion, in particular the element of common humanity (and connectedness rather than separateness)  gave me the release from this destructive relational thinking.  I was able to try at least to treat myself as I would a friend, and to bridge the gap between myself and the people around me – their actions stopped feeling threatening, and started to feel caring and supportive.  I developed a sense of connection to others through a connection to myself.  

While striving to develop our talents and abilities to the fullest is desirable, a drive for perfection is one of the greatest obstacles to self-compassion, and is ultimately unachievable.  Through self-compassion, I have accepted that I am not meant nor expected to be perfect.  I know that developing an understanding of how to treat myself with more caring, concern, kindness - and an acknowledgement of when and why it is sometimes so difficult - has improved my life.  I am more hopeful, more in control and empowered to manage my physical and emotional wellbeing. This has opened up the possibility of facing opportunities in life from a place of more wisdom. 

The journey has been a long one, starting when I first stepped onto a yoga mat, and now involves daily time on my meditation cushion.  It is a  journey that will continue to support me on my path with gratitude and a more compassionate and forgiving attitude, towards myself as well as towards others.  

This journey has not always been easy.  At times I am so immersed in the harsh self judgements that I am not able to separate myself from the thoughts and feelings, and they become my truth – for a moment.  Developing the habit of a daily meditation and yoga practice - through persistent perseverance - means that I am much more quickly able to notice those moments when I am adding to my suffering. I am able to see when I am resisting or fighting the emotions that I do not want to be feeling, and therefore forgetting to acknowledge the difficulty of what I am experiencing. With mindful awareness of the times that I am struggling, I am able to gently remind myself that it will pass, that I am not alone in feeling this way, and that I have techniques to soothe myself.  

Key for me was to remember that self-compassion is a better motivator for personal progress than any negative reinforcement or judgement of “what I should have done, or should have been…” could ever be

Mindfulness and self-compassion – it is no exaggeration to say that it has saved me. Mindfulness has helped me to become aware of what emotions I am feeling, without judging them, and to listen to what my body is teaching me.  With this self-awareness I can respond to challenges, rather than react.  And I can focus my attention on things like my breath in order to cultivate some peace and stillness.  

Mindful self-compassion has stopped the self-referential, often critical and harsh thinking.  I have been able to get out of my own way, and flow with what is…  

From 20 years of institutionalization within eating disorders units I am happier, more trusting, more engaged, more compassionate, more alive and excited for the future. My belief in the gift and power of Mindful Self Compassion - having seen it first hand in myself, and in the many students that I have had the pleasure to share the journey with, is a constant inspiration and joy.

About the Author

Thea Fitch is a person-centred counselor and trained Mindful Self-Compassion teacher. You can read more about Thea here and find out about her upcoming trainings here.

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Understanding Needs and Values

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Understanding Needs and Values

Working with needs and values is a central part of cultivating compassion for ourselves and others. Although everyone has needs and values, and they have such a strong influence on our lives, many people are unaware of what their needs and values are. Once we are more in touch with our needs and values, we can start to use them to guide our behaviour so that we are able to live more fulfilling and meaningful lives.

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The Neuroscience of Compassion with Tania Singer

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The Neuroscience of Compassion with Tania Singer

Can training our brains help make the world a better place? Tania Singer from the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences thinks it can. She’s a social neuroscientist and psychologist who says the brain’s plasticity means it can be trained to make us less selfish and more compassionate.

In this video for the World Economic Forum, Professor Singer explains the ReSource project and the exciting results her 1-year longitudinal study on the impact of mental training involving a combination of mindfulness, perspective-taking, and compassion. 

The take home messages? First, we can change our brains, our reactions to stress and relationships with others in very specific ways using mental training techniques. Second, the amount of time we spend training does seem to matter. Third, not all mental trainings are created equal - mindfulness meditation alone has a very different impact on the brain than compassion training or training in perspective taking. 

NB - it's interesting to note that the mindfulness training involve two core exercises: breathing and a body scan. It's unclear from this presentation how the instruction for these exercises differs from the exercises used in standard Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy or Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction programs.

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How to Do a Simple Breath Practice

We love this simple and effective breath practice from BreathAware. Keep it open on your computer and just follow the practice whenever you feel the need to settle your body and mind. Not only is this practice good for your physical health - improving cardiovascular health and strengthening core muscles - it also helps to reduce fatigue and stress. 

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Street LovingKindness with Sharon Salzberg

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Street LovingKindness with Sharon Salzberg

A delightful example of compassion in action from Sharon Salzberg - practising extending wishes of metta, or lovingkindness, to strangers in the street. Loving kindness practice can feel strange at first, particularly when done in a meditation, but this shows how simple it can be to extend goodwill to others - be it our friends, family, or a total stranger. 

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The Book of Life "On Higher Consciousness"

"It’s an astonishing gradual evolution to develop the ability to explain others’ actions by their distress, rather than simply in terms of how it affects us. We perceive that the appropriate response to humanity is not fear, cynicism or aggression, but always – when we can manage it – love.

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